New Report: Enterprising Cities -- Regulatory Climate Index 2014

Cities are the engines of economic growth and prosperity in the United States. Our urban economies thrive on innovation, expansion of small businesses, and entrepreneurship. Our economic achievement is inherently tied to a legal infrastructure and regulatory environment that is sensible for entrepreneurs and small businesses. ndp | analytics and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation are proud to release the Enterprising Cities: Regulatory Climate Index 2014 (the Index), which compares and ranks the efficiency of local regulations applying to small businesses in ten cities across the United States. 

The Index measures three components (number of procedures, time, and costs) that are required to comply with five areas of business regulation in each city. The Index assesses the areas of starting a business, dealing with construction permits, registering property, paying taxes, and enforcing contracts. The results act as a barometer for the overall business environment and point to areas where reform is necessary for competitiveness. 

The main results of the study are:

Among the 10 cities in the 2014 Index, the most efficient cities across all 5 areas of business regulation are Dallas and St. Louis. The cities of Raleigh, Boston, Atlanta, and Detroit have moderate levels of regulatory efficiency. Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, and New York City have the least efficient regulatory environments.

There are sizable variations in the design, practice, and costs to fulfill basic regulatory requirements for small businesses. Geographical and historical influences seem to account for much of this variance. The basic regulatory steps for opening and operating a business remain relatively similar across the cities measured. In recent years, these places have begun to adopt smarter business regulations and to streamline bureaucracies; however, the scope for improving their business environments remains significant.

Each city evaluated has its own clear strengths and weaknesses. For example, Los Angeles and San Francisco have the best practices for opening a business, yet both cities have the highest requirements and costs to obtain construction permits. St. Louis has the best practice for the registration of properties but scores below average in enforcing contracts. Chicago ranks highly for enforcing contracts while ranking lower for starting a business. 

All cities provide small businesses with information and materials to comply with their regulations. Yet the websites and publications are often disorganized, missing information, or unclear to third parties. Few cities provide detailed information on the procedures, expected waiting time, and administrative costs for construction permits. Overall, no city provides comprehensive information. 

At a time when America’s entrepreneurial dynamism is in decline, the costs of housing in our cities is soaring, and governments are challenging the existence of transformative companies, this project is more important than ever. The ease of doing business in America’s cities will help determine the future of America’s economic growth. The success of these places depends on improving existing regulatory processes, simplifying application and compliance with local laws, and trimming the barriers to entry for entrepreneurs.